10 Best Editor Portfolio Examples (That’ll Inspire You)

contemplation

 

You’ve been planning to get your editor portfolio out there for quite some time now.

 

So, what’s holding you back?

Perhaps you are envisioning creating not only an impactful and informative portfolio but a visually appealing one as well. Yet, you’re not sure how to do it.

Don’t fret.

I gathered some of the most impressive online editor portfolio examples I could find. They’re inspiring enough to set you on the path to coming up with your own.

 

Great Resume Service
ZipJob - Resumes that get you hired

If you want to make sure that your resume is polished to perfection, check the ZipJob service, which has already helped thousands of job seekers. They offer a free resume review, and have a proven track record of success.

Check it in a new tab
Affiliate link - thanks!

 

The 10 Best Editor Portfolio Examples:

 

I’ve included the following examples in no particular order. They are numbered just for the sake of organization and don’t represent any ranking.

I hope you’ll enjoy these portfolios and make your own soon!

 

1. Carolina VonKampen

 

cvk portfolio

Cropped screenshot of Carolina VonKampen’s portfolio page.

 

Carolina is a freelance editor who earned her editing certificate from the University of Chicago in 2019.

Besides her editing and copywriting gigs, she also publishes a seasonal print magazine called Capsule Stories, of which she is also the editor-in-chief.

She proofreads and edits a wide range of manuscripts, from fiction and non-fiction books to poetry, short stories, advertising copy, content marketing materials, and a lot more.

What strikes me most about her editing portfolio is the clever use of thumbnail photos of the book covers and prints of other literary materials she worked on.

The images are also neatly arranged in a grid pattern and classified according to their kind. She also includes the scope and type of work she did for each project.

There’s also a list of her ongoing and forthcoming projects, which somewhat solidifies her stake in the editing business.

Core Strategy to Emulate: The clever use of book cover design as thumbnails to open to a bigger image and broader info.

 

2. Jamie Birdwell-Branson

 

Jamie Birdwell-Branson (Freelance Writer & Editor)

testimonial

Screenshot of a testimonial from Jamie Birdwell-Branson’s portfolio page.

 

Jamie earned her stripes in the editing business by working on books, academic papers, and online content as a freelancer while holding the position of managing editor for Hunker.com.

She earned a certificate for copyediting from the University of California San Diego Extension program. She is well versed in both AP Style and the Chicago Manual of Style writing and editing.

Even though there is too much to be desired from her editing portfolio page, I like the idea of her posting testimonials from her past clients. Satisfied customers putting in a good word for you adds tremendous value to your reputation.

Just like most, if not all, professional and freelance editors, Jamie also offers copywriting services. So, I suggest you check out her writing portfolio page as well as you can glean some great ideas from there.

 

Core Strategy to Emulate: The use of testimonials or rave reviews from satisfied clients. Nobody can validate you better than those who have past experiences working with you.

 

Definitive Guide for Writers
The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition
$55.02

Master the art of written and oral communication with this wonderful book. A must-read for those who seek to find their place in the world of print and online publications.

Buy Now
If you click and buy something, I will earn a commission at zero extra cost to you. Thanks for support!
04/21/2022 12:21 am GMT

 

3. Louise Harnby

 

LH portfolio

Cropped screenshot of Louise Harnby’s portfolio page.

 

Louise takes her portfolio to a different level by building an entire blog around it.

Not only that. She also keeps her editing services to fiction, more particularly, the mystery, crime, thriller, and suspense genres.

I would have to say that this is an editor after my own heart. As a blogger myself, I try to educate others on the money-making potential of blogging and the importance of finding your niche in the process.

So, I’m guessing that Louise has also found other revenue streams from her blog while promoting her services as a freelance editor at the same time. Talk about hitting two birds with one stone.

She’s also helping other writers and editors by suggesting solutions and business tools for honing their craft.

 

Core Strategy to Emulate: Turning your online portfolio into a fully functioning blog or website to help others and generate extra revenue as well.

 

4. Three Fates Editing by Sarah Liu

 

3FE

Cropped screenshot of Three Fates Editing’s portfolio page.

 

A chance meeting with one of her favorite authors, Sara King, while working as a pharmacy technician, changed the course of Sarah’s life forever.

That chance meeting not only put her on a path to a lucrative career as an editor but also to dive into higher education. Not only did she earn a bachelor’s degree but a master’s as well.

And when you think that things can’t get better from that point on, her editing profession also led her to the world of entrepreneurship.

What am I talking about?

One thing I admired about her portfolio is that besides showcasing her past projects, her site is also playing an active part in selling the novels and other books that she worked on by becoming an Amazon affiliate.

This is another thing you should consider in building your portfolio. What she did gives her the potential to earn passive income from book sales.

 

Core Strategy to Emulate: Signing up as an Amazon affiliate to take an active part in helping your client sell their work, wherein you can also earn commissions in the process.

 

5. Editor Group

 

EG portfolio

Cropped screenshot of Editor Group’s portfolio page.

 

Unlike the other ones on this list, this portfolio is not by a freelancer or an independent contractor but by an editing agency. And not a small one, mind you, but an international corporation.

Editor Group has headquarters in New York, Singapore, and Sydney. Among its esteemed clienteles are the Australian Government, Hewlett Packard, HSBC, Cisco, and other top corporations.

What impressed me most with their portfolio page is the prominent and neatly arranged display of their clients’ logos, which they used as thumbnails.

When you click a thumbnail, it will take you to a separate page, where you will see the project overview and the solutions they delivered to that client.

They also provide links to take you to their client’s site and the pages they worked on.

 

Core Strategy to Emulate: Providing a comprehensive profile for each project completed and providing a link to the finished product.

 

6. Noel Editorial

 

NE portfolio

Cropped screenshot of Noel Editorial portfolio page.

 

This editing company is run by a brother and sister team.

Chris Noel specializes in structural editing and has worked on manuscripts of various independent authors. He is a book writer himself and has published several titles with Random House and Alfred A. Knopf.

Susannah Noel has been in the editing biz since 1995 and works as a freelance editor and proofreader for big publishing houses such as Penguin Random House and McMillan.

They provided a glimpse of the types of editing they do on their portfolio page. However, they kept some aces up their sleeves by compelling the readers to get in touch with them to see more.

They also feature cover photos of the published books they worked on, but no links.

 

Core Strategy to Emulate: Instead of providing every detail for each project you worked on, you may opt to let potential clients contact you so you can provide them with more personalized information.

 

7. Kirsten Janene-Nelson

 

KJN portfolio

Cropped screenshot of Kirsten Janene-Nelson’s portfolio page.

 

Perhaps Kirsten decided her track record and credentials were enough so she could do away with stunning photos or fancy graphics for her portfolio.

It’s rather simple when compared to the more colorful and image-rich portfolios that her peers and competitors have, but it can hold up against the rest of the field.

A track record in the biz that goes back for over two-and-a-half decades, and the experience of working with well-established book authors seem to be enough to make her presence known.

If you already have an impressive list of editorial credits like hers, then you follow her example and list them all down.

It would also be more imperative if you provide links to the published books or online articles you worked on in the past as she did. Provided, of course, you have your clients’ permission.

 

Core Strategy to Emulate: List down your most notable work and link to the publisher’s site or purveyors of the books you worked on.

 

Digital Portfolio Maker App

 

I need to switch gears at this point to inform you that the final three examples I am going to show you are all made on a platform called Journo Portfolio.

This website not only enables you to easily create portfolios with pre-set themes and templates, but it provides you with everything you need to establish an online presence, including domain name and Google Analytics integration, among others.

You can avail of their services for free, but you can only upload a maximum of 10 articles on your portfolio. If you want to upload an unlimited number of articles and enjoy the other special features they offer, then you have to buy one of their paid packages.

Their published rates are $2.50/month for the Plus (+ 2 months free if you pay annually), and $5/month for the Pro (+ 3 months free if you pay annually).

 

Going Back to Our List:

 

8. Darren Paltrowitz

 

DP portfolio

Cropped screenshot of Darren Paltrowitz’s portfolio page.

 

Darren is not only an editor but an award-winning writer as well. This New Yorker is also a TV host, a published author, and a podcaster.

A music-lover who used to work with various bands and solo artists, he wrote articles for All Music Guide and Guitar World, as well as other prestigious publications such as Businessweek, the L.A. Times, New York Daily News, and a lot more.

What will strike you about his portfolio is the abundance of photos of celebrities, which serve as clickable thumbnails that link to his articles in various online publications such as The Hype and Downtown.

One thing I observed about his digital portfolio is its strong visual impact.

 

Core Strategy to Emulate: If the scope of your work involves writing or editing articles about celebrities and high-profile personalities, then capitalize on it by all means.

 

9. Derek Robertson

 

DR portfolio

Cropped screenshot of Derek Robertson’s portfolio page.

 

While I am very much aware that Derek just used one of Journo Portfolio’s pre-set themes, I still have to say kudos to him on this one.

This freelance writer and editor is a regular contributor to both print and online publications. It includes The Guardian, VICE, NME, The Face, and several others.

Derek is also a content provider for brands and organizations from various countries, such as the UK, Spain, and the USA.

What I find visually appealing about the layout of his profile is the clever use of columns and boxes that gives it the look and feel of a magazine or tabloid page.

And, instead of just using photos as clickable thumbnails that link to actual articles, it also includes a headline and a snippet of the introduction. As I said, it’s like you’re reading a magazine or the daily paper.

 

Core Strategy to Emulate: Presenting your clickable thumbnails like a newspaper or magazine column with a headline and a part of the article body can entice readers to continue reading.

 

10. Greta Forslund

 

GF portfolio

Cropped screenshot of Greta Forslund’s portfolio page.

 

Greta strikes me as a go-getter. She is still a full-time student, yet she already put out there a kick-ass journalist/editor digital portfolio.

It seems like she is ready to make her mark in her chosen field even before she flips the tassel on her toga.

What I find remarkable in her portfolio is that she wrote a comprehensive essay about herself highlighting what she has accomplished so far at her young age.

She also took full advantage of the platform’s templates in showcasing impressive samples of her work. One feature I like about the theme she has chosen is the left-hand margin that bears a short blurb about her.

 

Core Strategy to Emulate: Don’t dilly dally in creating your portfolio and putting it out there. Make your presence felt in the market as soon as you have something to show for yourself.

 

Final Words

 

Writing and editing is an art. And just like visual artists, you should have a compilation of past work to show others before you will be taken seriously about your craft.

Unless you already made a name for yourself, you should always have a portfolio ready when presenting yourself to potential clients or employers.

A great portfolio can increase your value in a crowded marketplace. I hope the examples I brought up here have inspired you or given you an idea of how you can make yours.

Please let me know if you have anything to add to the discussion. I would love to hear comments from you!

Rafal Reyzer

Hey there, welcome to my blog! I'm a full-time blogger, educator, digital marketer, freelancer, editor and content manager. I started RafalReyzer.com to provide you with great tools and strategies you can use to achieve freedom from 9-5 through online creativity. My site is a one-stop-shop for writers, bloggers, publishers, content enthusiasts and freelancers who want to be independent, earn more money and create beautiful things. Feel free to check my archive containing over 400 articles and reach out if you need anything. Ah yes, and stay awesome!